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Burberry make some changes at the top

Riccardo Tisci is now the new Chief Creative Officer at Burberry.

Burberry has named Riccardo Tisci as its new chief creative officer, he succeeds Christopher Bailey, who stepped down after 17 years from the creative helm. Having spent more than a decade at Givenchy as a creative director, Riccardo left the brand once his contract expired in January 2018. Givenchy is credited with being one of LVMH's most successful luxury brands.

"I have an enormous respect for Burberry's British heritage and global appeal and I am excited about the potential of this exceptional brand,” added Tisci. “I am honoured and delighted to be joining Burberry and reuniting with Marco Gobbetti ( Burberry’s chief executive ).”

Riccardo will direct all of Burberry’s collections from his new London base, and is expected to present his first for the brand in September.

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First Major U.S. Department Store to Sell Hijabs

Macy's is launching a women's line of clothing aimed at Muslim shoppers.

The chain announced it has teamed up with a boutique called Verona Collection and will sell the collection of "modest" dresses, tops, cardigans and hijabs online. The collection will launch on Macy's website on Feb. 15.

The brand was developed by Lisa Vogl, a graduate of Macy's minority- and women-owned business development program, which aims to offer more fashion diversity.

Though Macy's is the first major U.S. department store to sell hijabs, it joins brands like Nike, for example, who aim products at Muslims. Nike launched a high-performance hijab last year made for athletes. 

Macy's closing 125 stores


Representative from Macy's said last week that there are plans in place to close 125 of its stores over the next couple of years and cut minimum 2,000 corporate jobs as a cost-savings effort.

The company said it would close stores in lower-tier malls, and explore new avenues, as it looks to tackle plummeting mall traffic.

The chain, which has been struggling to boost store traffic as consumers opt for online shopping in the United States, has closed more than 100 stores since 2015 and cut thousands of jobs.

"We will focus our resources on the healthy parts of our business, directly address the unhealthy parts of the business and explore new revenue streams," Chief Executive Jeff Gennette said.

The to-be-closed 125 stores currently account for about $1.4 billion in annual sales, the company said.

It also said it expects annual gross cost savings of $1.5 billion by 2022, with $600 million expected in 2020.

It forecast full-year net sales to be between $23.6 billion and $23.9 billion, below analysts' average estimate of $24.36 billion, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.


Condé Nast to put up 3 Magazines for Sale!

The brand behind Vogue, New Yorker and Vanity Fair are forced to take some austerity measures after losses of up to $120 Million last year. They have taken measures to cut spending and be more digitally savvy, but it is expected to adopt strategies to ensure that it does not disappear completely.

After Boston Consulting Group did a monthlong audit of their internal systems, Robert A. Sauerberg Jr., the chief executive of Condé Nast, plans to address senior staff members on August 8th.

The company having lost more than $120 million last year, plans to put three of its 14 magazines — Brides, Golf Digest and W — up for sale, three executives said. The marquee titles, including Vogue, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker are safe, for now.

The decades-long magazine boom that made the ostentatious possible, is a thing of the past. A shift in media-consumption has elevated Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube above the printed page. Before Time Inc. was sold to the Meredith Corporation, it experienced sharp declines in annual revenue. The ad buying firm Magna projects print magazine ad sales will fall by a double digit rate this year.

The $120 million loss in 2017 came about because of a sharp decline in ad revenue generated by the print magazines. Gains in the digital arena have helped offset the loss, but not enough to make the company profitable. Condé Nast reached its decision to entertain offers for Brides, Golf Digest and W partly on the recommendation of Boston Consulting Group.

This story appeared in the New York Times.

Mario Testino and Bruce Weber Banned from Condé Nast over sexual exploitation accusations

Fifteen current and former male models and thirteen male assistants and models have accused top fashion photographers Mario Testino and Bruce Weber, of coercive sexual behavior. The investigation has been in the works since the last couple of months.

Though representatives of both the accused have denied all allegations, publishing giant Condé Nast have announced, it will stop working with them. So far spokespersons for Michael Kors Holding ltd and Stuart Weitzman, have also said that they will not be working with MarioTestino in the foreseeable future.

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