Frances richest families pledge upto $300 Million to help re-construct the historic sight

Controlling Groups at LVMH and Kering pledge $300 Million to Rebuild Notre-Dame

According to BOF, the French luxury industry is using its riches to save the historic monument, the Notre-Dam after the devastation of a mysterious fire destroyed the famous church.

The families behind luxury groups LVMH and Kering, two of France's largest companies, have pledged to donate a combined €300 million to help rebuild historic Notre-Dame, the 856-year-old cathedral, which survived two world wars, but was devastated by fire Monday night.

Kering chief executive Francois-Henri Pinault and his billionaire father, Francois Pinault, said around midnight local time that they would donate €100 million via the family investment vehicle Artemis to help finance repairs to the building, which was declared a world heritage site by UNESCO in 1991.

Bernard Arnault, chairman and chief executive of rival luxury group LVMH, followed the gesture with a pledge of €200 million.

LVMH employees will also serve as volunteers — "including creative, architectural and financial specialists" — to support the reconstruction of the cathedral, which is already in progress.

Related News

Two Editors at Vogue Step Down

The two top editors of Vogue, Phyllis Posnick, the executive fashion editor of Vogue stepped down alongside fashion director Tonne Goodman last week. They are considered the two most recognisable faces at any fashion show in New York.

It was announced by Anna Wintour, the editor of Vogue, that both Phyllis and Tonne will leave their staff positions and become contributing editors.

The position of fashion director will be taken up by Virginia Smith.

First Major U.S. Department Store to Sell Hijabs

Macy's is launching a women's line of clothing aimed at Muslim shoppers.

The chain announced it has teamed up with a boutique called Verona Collection and will sell the collection of "modest" dresses, tops, cardigans and hijabs online. The collection will launch on Macy's website on Feb. 15.

The brand was developed by Lisa Vogl, a graduate of Macy's minority- and women-owned business development program, which aims to offer more fashion diversity.

Though Macy's is the first major U.S. department store to sell hijabs, it joins brands like Nike, for example, who aim products at Muslims. Nike launched a high-performance hijab last year made for athletes. 

Adidas to Close Stores

Adidas expects to close down stores as part of a shift towards selling more goods online.

In an interview with the Financial Times, Kasper Rorsted said "over time, we will have fewer stores but they will be better," adding that over the coming year the number of Adidas stores was expected to contract slightly.

"Our website is the most important store we have in the world."

Adidas, which wants to double its e-commerce sales to €4 billion ($4.91 billion) by 2020 from the €1.6 billion it hit last year, with 2,500 stores globally and 13,000 additional mono-branded franchise stores, the Financial Times have said.

Tiffany Sold!

Luxury conglomerate LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE has reached a $16.2 billion deal to buy American jewellery giant Tiffany & Co.

The companies announced that they had entered an agreement for LVMH to acquire Tiffany for $135 a share.

“We strongly believe that LVMH is not only an ideal owner for Tiffany but also that this iconic brand is a perfect addition to our portfolio and perfect complement to our existing model,” LVMH Chief Financial Officer Jean-Jacques Guiony.

The all-cash acquisition is one of the largest ever for the French conglomerate known for its hard-charging deal making and surpasses its $13 billion deal for Christian Dior in 2017.

The storied American brand has resisted acquisition for years, but as one of the few independent global jewellery houses remaining in the market, analysts had long speculated that it would make an attractive, if expensive, target.

But Tiffany has had a difficult time lately. In the first half of 2019, worldwide net sales at Tiffany decreased 3 percent to $2.1 billion. The American jeweller is facing weak demand at home and abroad, and will likely need heavy investment to re-energise its brand and business.

The deal will bring LVMH’s substantial financial and market clout to help support Tiffany’s ongoing transformation efforts. At the same time, it boosts the French company’s presence in the US market.

The deal also allows LVMH to gain further ground on Swiss conglomerate Richemont, which has long dominated hard luxury with its ownership of Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels. Jewellery was one of the best-performing luxury categories in 2018, according to Bain & Co, which predicts that the global $20 billion market will grow 7 percent this year.

Tiffany employs more than 5,000 artisans to cut diamonds and craft its jewellery, rather than buying from middlemen.


Designed by IMD.