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Latest campaign from Calvin Klein is lit

The latest campaign by Calvin Klein, features 90s supermodel Cindy Crawford's children, Kaia and Presely Gerber. Other than the two known models, there are real siblings, driving the brand’s Our Family. #MYCALVINS campaign. The concept revolves around strong unity amongst people, symbolised by the use of the traditional American quilt.

"Whether you’re related or you bond over shared dreams, family is what you make it. A patchwork of individuals, unified and unbreakable"

www.CalvinKlein.com

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Versace Nostalgia

Nothing but nostalgic magic. At Versace’s SS18 show  Donatella Versace walked down with the 90's icons for the finale. The shows collection reinvented Gianni’s iconic prints from the Vogue look to Animalier to Barocco. 2017 marked the 20th anniversary to the gruesome death of Gianni Versace.

Where do Global Brands recruit new talent?

Business Of Fashion talk about how times have changed and now you need to go to specific schools, where globals brands have started academic programmes to help them recruit top talents. Such feeder programmes, offering both bachelors and masters degrees, are key to landing entry level positions in global brands.

Adidas to Close Stores

Adidas expects to close down stores as part of a shift towards selling more goods online.

In an interview with the Financial Times, Kasper Rorsted said "over time, we will have fewer stores but they will be better," adding that over the coming year the number of Adidas stores was expected to contract slightly.

"Our website is the most important store we have in the world."

Adidas, which wants to double its e-commerce sales to €4 billion ($4.91 billion) by 2020 from the €1.6 billion it hit last year, with 2,500 stores globally and 13,000 additional mono-branded franchise stores, the Financial Times have said.

Start-Up Sells Luxury Items, Minus the Branding

We all know that markups in luxury fashion can be ridiculously high. The journey from the factory to floor, gets items to be priced at higher than they cost.

Now E-commerce site Italic is betting that removing the branding and the mark-up will prove a hit with consumers. A big bet indeed!

The start-up’s members-only marketplace, which launched last Thursday, allows manufacturers that create products for luxury brands to sell directly to consumers without the LOGOs adding markups. Shoppers who pay a $120 annual membership fee can choose from a selection of unbranded luxury goods, from bags and wallets to prescription eyewear and leather jackets, produced by the same factories that count names like Prada, Givenchy, Celine and Burberry among their clients.

The company has raised $13 million in funding, from various top end investors. Over 100,000 people joined a waiting list to be notified when membership opens, with signups initially limited to the US, said company founder Jeremy Cai.

Upon launching, the platform will have nearly 60 styles live on the site, with a view to double this number by the end of the year. However, customers won’t find unbranded versions of the Gucci Dionysus bag or any of the latest Celine creations. All products sold on Italic will be unique and exclusive to the platform to avoid infringing on brands’ intellectual property / copyrighted designs.

The start-up joins a growing number of brands, including Everlane and Warby Parker, which provide a premium-feeling, minimally branded product at relatively affordable prices. Within the luxury sector, high-end retailers, including Mr Porter, Joseph and MatchesFashion, are expanding their private label collections, which tend to be priced below standard luxury fare.

Italic goes one step further, selling items that lack even the private label branding. The marketplace will instead focus on providing the infrastructure — from marketing, design and warehousing to customer support — to enable manufacturers to sell products directly. The company will take a commission on sales.

“We essentially do everything that brands do and more, but we do it for the manufacturers,” Cai said.

For example, Italic’s merchandising team will work with factories that have product and pattern libraries to tweak existing designs so they don’t mimic products already on the market. Italic also has two designers, alumni of Armani and Calvin Klein, to work with manufacturers that don’t have in-house creative teams.

“We are very careful about every single product that we sell being originally designed, you won’t find an exact product like it in the market,” Cai said. “We want breadth and coverage of a lot of different styles.”

Branding can be a powerful tool, especially in a sector like luxury, where purchases are emotional rather than practical. That’s especially true for “statement” products, like handbags.

“People buy branded products to be reassured of the quality and style of the item and also for their projected image: they somehow communicate to other people the style, sophistication and preferences of their owner,” said Mario Ortelli, managing partner of luxury advisors Ortelli & Co. “You want to feel and show that you are part of the brand story.”

But Cai doesn’t anticipate the manufacturers on Italic’s marketplace competing head to head with luxury brands.

“For a person who is going to buy a Gucci bag, we are never going to win them over with unbranded product,” he said. “That doesn’t mean in some avenue of their life, they wouldn’t be open to switching up their sheets or maybe a shirt, or a leather jacket, where they actually don’t like a logo on there.”

As well as geographical expansion and international shipping, the platform’s short term goals include expanding into product categories like activewear and beauty. The focus will remain on luxury, Cai said.

“The reason we want to start in luxury is because we can say to the customer: we can make premium product effectively and replace a lot of your aspirational shopping,” he said.


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